pasques:

tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either
scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
the idea to put ants on stilts
there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
confused ants

Trying to figure out that they count their steps was not a waste of time. It will lead to advances in nanoscience and other small tech fields.
But this is why people should get into science. It’s like myth busters without the explosions.

pasques:

tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either

  • scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
  • the idea to put ants on stilts
  • there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
  • confused ants

Trying to figure out that they count their steps was not a waste of time. It will lead to advances in nanoscience and other small tech fields.

But this is why people should get into science. It’s like myth busters without the explosions.

(Source: memewhore)

marxvx:

assdownloader:

"don’t support nestle!" shouts the liberal on the computer made from parts manufactured at foxconn

consumer activism is a lie, see you in hell or in communism

lmao try boycotting a brand in monopoly capitalism

image

(Source: sludgewave420)

prostheticknowledge:

Ghost In The Machine

Portrait artwork by Ted Lawson is drawn with a machine using a direct feed of blood from the artist as the ink - video embedded below:

Artist, Ted Lawson, creates a life-sized self-portrait drawing, in his own blood, using a robot.

Link

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon

Can the shape, texture and colour of cutlery change the way food tastes? Design Academy Eindhoven graduate Jinhyun Jeon created this set of knobbly, bulbous and serrated cutlery to stimulate diners’ full range of senses at the table.

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

Jinhyun Jeon, a graduate of the Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands, made Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli as part of her MA thesis about the relationship between food and the senses.

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

The project was inspired by the phenomenon of synesthesia, a neurological condition in which stimuli like taste, colour and hearing are affected and triggered by each other. People with synesthesia often report seeing a certain colour when they hear a particular word, for example.

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

To find out whether this “sensory cross-wiring” could be encouraged and used to enhance taste, Jeon created cutlery based on five sensory elements:

  • colour,
  • tactility (texture)
  • temperature,
  • volume and weight,
  • form/shape

The ceramic pieces shown below explore the effects of colour, with various coloured glazes defining the tips of each implement.  Warm colours such as red and orange are supposed to increase appetite, says Jeon, and are most effective when used sparingly.  [Some of the ceramic pieces also explore the effects of bumpy-textured undersides and unexpected shapes/volumes.]

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

Other pieces are made from stainless steel, silver or plastic, and the various textures and shapes are intended to stimulate the sense of touch inside the mouth.

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli by Jinhyun Jeon

The plastic pieces resemble glass, which creates a jarring sensation for the user when the item’s appearance is incongruous with its feel. ”We tend to believe our sight and touch would be the same, but this is not the whole story,” says Jeon.

"The tools I created make us focus on each bite, feel the enriched textures or enhanced chewing sounds between bites," she told Dezeen. "If we can stretch the borders of what tableware can do, the eating experience can be enriched."

Hamster wheel knitting machine
(It only knits cords, not whole sheets of fabric, but still pretty cool.  I want to start a company where I use a full-size knitting machine to make the fabric for lace-up vests and my hamster uses this to make the laces :3)

Hamster wheel knitting machine

(It only knits cords, not whole sheets of fabric, but still pretty cool.  I want to start a company where I use a full-size knitting machine to make the fabric for lace-up vests and my hamster uses this to make the laces :3)

teal-deer:

crobh-dearg:

lee-enfeel:

IF YOU DON’T THINK TRANSHUMANISM IS THE HYPEST SHIT GET OUT OF MY FACE

WHAT IF IM WORRIED THAT IT’LL WIDEN AND SOLIDIFY THE GAP BETWEEN RICH AND POOR, WITH THE SUPER RICH HAVING ACCESS TO FUNCTIONAL IMMORTALITY TO ENSURE THEIR POWER?

Yeah I wanna be a robot but that part terrifies me

science:

While we’re on the topic of quantum physics, here is a nifty illustration from Wikipedia of the elementary particles of the Standard Model. “Atom” means indivisible, as atoms were originally thought to be the smallest parts of the universe, the bits that compose everything else but are not themselves composed of smaller particles. As physics advanced, scientists found that atoms consisted of even smaller particles, and these are the smallest, atomic (indivisible) parts of reality as far as we know today, according to the most accurate and experimentally verified theory of physics as of 2014. Notably missing is the graviton, a particle hypothesized to be the carrier of the elementary force of gravitation, but as of today physicists have been unable to create a theory that unifies the three forces of the Standard Model—the electromagnetic force, the strong and the weak nuclear force—with gravity.
The fact that these particles are regarded as elementary doesn’t necessarily mean that they aren’t composed of even smaller particles. It could be that in the future, likely when we can study even higher energies than those in our most powerful particle accelerators—big machines that collide particles at enormous velocities, generating extreme energies in order, basically, to see what happens, what comes of the collision—we will discover that these particles are composed of even smaller constituents. But as it stands right now, these are the smallest things we know exist, and as of now, based on the information we possess from experiments and mathematical theories, we think they’re indivisible. Nothing, as far as we know, is smaller than those particles up there.
If you’re missing the familiar protons and neutrons, they are composed of quarks, held together by the strong nuclear force, which is mediated by the gluon. The electron, however, swirling about the atomic nucleus, is believed to be elementary. Perhaps one day we’ll peek further into the depths of the quantum world and discover smaller things, but that’s where it stands right now.

science:

While we’re on the topic of quantum physics, here is a nifty illustration from Wikipedia of the elementary particles of the Standard Model. “Atom” means indivisible, as atoms were originally thought to be the smallest parts of the universe, the bits that compose everything else but are not themselves composed of smaller particles. As physics advanced, scientists found that atoms consisted of even smaller particles, and these are the smallest, atomic (indivisible) parts of reality as far as we know today, according to the most accurate and experimentally verified theory of physics as of 2014. Notably missing is the graviton, a particle hypothesized to be the carrier of the elementary force of gravitation, but as of today physicists have been unable to create a theory that unifies the three forces of the Standard Model—the electromagnetic force, the strong and the weak nuclear force—with gravity.

The fact that these particles are regarded as elementary doesn’t necessarily mean that they aren’t composed of even smaller particles. It could be that in the future, likely when we can study even higher energies than those in our most powerful particle accelerators—big machines that collide particles at enormous velocities, generating extreme energies in order, basically, to see what happens, what comes of the collision—we will discover that these particles are composed of even smaller constituents. But as it stands right now, these are the smallest things we know exist, and as of now, based on the information we possess from experiments and mathematical theories, we think they’re indivisible. Nothing, as far as we know, is smaller than those particles up there.

If you’re missing the familiar protons and neutrons, they are composed of quarks, held together by the strong nuclear force, which is mediated by the gluon. The electron, however, swirling about the atomic nucleus, is believed to be elementary. Perhaps one day we’ll peek further into the depths of the quantum world and discover smaller things, but that’s where it stands right now.

People, and especially men, hate being alone with their thoughts so much that they’d rather be in pain. In a study published in Science Thursday on the ability of people to let their minds “wander” — that is, for them to sit and do nothing but think — researchers found that about a quarter of women and two-thirds of men chose electric shocks over their own company.

washington post (on people being left alone for 15 fucking minutes)